Resuscitation! (or, Impostor Syndrome II)

So it turns out that when you are on your research block you have absolutely nothing to write about. Patients are funny, residents are funny, and hapless medical students are hilarious, but there is absolutely nothing funny about research. My project is in the field of medical education, which I find intellectually stimulating and worthwhile but primarily involves attending meetings, reading journal articles that freely use phrases like “cognitive load” and “contextually embedded orchestration of skills,” and sitting in front of a computer. Continue reading

Stockholm Syndrome

According to experts, the five most painful things in the universe are:

  • Childbirth
  • Kidney stones (no, really)
  • Rounding on medicine
  • Physical therapy
  • Vietnamese bamboo torture.

Number 4 is maybe my own invention.

As you may remember from “Return of the Phalanx,” about seven weeks ago I broke a small bone in my finger playing the world’s stupidest version of the world’s most entertaining and damaging sport, flag football. After my doctor confirmed there wasn’t any tendon damage, she referred me to physical therapy to “regain function.” Continue reading

Rules for Step 2

In case you haven’t figured it out by now, medical school is actually three different curricula in one.

There’s the Learn To Be A Doctor Curriculum, which is where you haphazardly learn to take care of people mostly by screwing up over and over again. This has almost zero connection to the rest of medical school, as the bulk of the Learn To Be A Doctor Curriculum is taught in residency. Not incidentally this is why medical students are often not allowed to Do Things, which as you’ll recall is practically the only thing I want to do. Things. Continue reading

The B Pod

My emergency medicine rotation has ended, and all I want to do is go back to the ER.

Actually that’s a lie. All I actually want to do is sit on my couch and do my best Fat Bastard impersonation by watching eight hours of NFL Red Zone. Which, if we are being honest, is exactly what I am going to do. Being between blocks in the third and fourth years is a little bit like getting a 48-hour pass from prison: no responsibilities, no homework, no email if you don’t want it, and nothing to do. Continue reading